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Brazil - Jararacas, Lobisomen

Jararacas: Generally appearing in the form of a snake the Jararacas feeds from the breasts of nursing mothers. The children are pushed out of the way and kept quiet by shoving its tail into their mouths. The Jararacas preys mostly on women for obvious reasons. Jaracara and Jaracaca were both commonly used erroneous spelling.

Lobisomen: This creature was reported to be small, stumpy and hunch-backed, with bloodless lips, yellow skin, black teeth, bushy beard and the looks of a monkey, the bite of this vampire turns its female victims into nymphomaniacs. To dispose of Lobisomen, get it drunk on blood and crucify it to a tree while stabbing it. Another version of the Lobisomen is based on a Portuguese mythical creature found in the folklore of South American, mainly Brazil, and is actually a Portuguese werewolf. However it is continually listed in vampire indexes. The Lobisomen does not kill, but prefers to draw out blood from its victims. It is reported that women who survive its attack soon after exhibit definite nymphomaniac tendencies. Commonly seen misspelled as Lobishomen


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