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Byelorussia - Krijvasmok, Mjertovjec, Upír, Vupar

Krijvasmok: Seen used in several Byelorussian language books.

Mjertovjec: The Mjertovjec is an apostate (someone who renounces their beliefs), werewolf or witch who has died. This vampire will follow poppy seeds from its home back to its tomb.

Upír: Undergoing further research.

Vupar: Requires further research.



Chile - ChonChon

ChonChon: In the folklore of Araucanian Indians of Chile, the ChonChon was a vampire with a human head and huge ears. It uses its large ears for wings to fly about seeking its prey. Yet another similar creature in folklore appears in the folklore of rural Peru and Chile. It is said that after a person's death, the head will sometimes sprout enormous ears and lift off from the shoulders. This flying head is the ChonChon; its sound, as recorded by Jorge Luis Borges, was like tui-tui-tui. Could the legends of the ChonChon have sprung from the same source as the Camazotz legends?


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